Funded by the NOAA Educational Partnership Program with Minority-Serving Institutions Cooperative Agreement Award #NA16SEC4810009

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NOAA partnerships and smart technology will map our understanding of the deepest and darkest ocean regions.

America’s waters are largely unknown, with vast areas still unmapped. Only 46 percent of U.S. ocean, coastal and Great Lakes waters are mapped to modern standards.

New and expanded NOAA partnerships can help fill these gaps, supporting a national strategy to completely map U.S. deep water by 2030 and nearshore waters by 2040. This year, NOAA and eight ocean partners agreed to explore, characterize and share ocean data, helping to close gaps in mapping the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and build understanding about remote global areas.

probing the unknown
General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) Natural Earth

NOAA’s partnership with Vulcan, Inc. recognizes that filling data gaps is a call to action. Since sound data underlie sound policy, robust data are essential to knowing how well ocean strategies and policies are working.

Seeing foundational data as a game-changer, NOAA and Vulcan look forward to jointly pursuing research aimed at advancing technologies to better understand the deep ocean.

Shared interests include NOAA science and data-collection capabilities and Vulcan's investments in incubating technologies and tackling a range of environmental issues.

probing the unknown
Scientists deploy a Deep Argo float, which profiles 3.7 miles deep, taking temperature and salinity on the way down. Other Argo floats measure on the way up to the surface. Some also measure nitrate, oxygen and other chemical elements.

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